torbreck, runrig, barossa valley 2015
WINE ENTHUSIAST
93
WINE SPECTATOR
92

2015 torbreck, runrig, barossa valley

Why We're Buying

Torbreck RunRig shows why shiraz is the flagship grape of Australia. The dense and fruity complexion rewards owners with a one-of-a-kind experience. The true beneficiaries, though, are the investors who let it age for ten to 20 years.

Critics Scores

WINE ENTHUSIAST
93

Wine Enthusiast

An extra year in bottle for this premium, blockbuster wine does it a lot of good. Things feel more more open and relaxed. The nose smells like Christmas pudding, with notes of raisiny red fruit and plums, baking spices, toffee, chocolate and vanillin oak, as well as hints of green-herbal and dusting-polish characters at the rear. Fruit on the palate is silky but tightly lassoed with fine powerful granular tannins and large helpings of high-end oak. If the fruit can hold up as well as the tannins and oak, this wine should cellar until 2034 or longer.

WINE SPECTATOR
92

Wine Spectator

Juicy and vibrant, with plenty of oomph to the herb-scented blackberry and plum flavors at the core, offering spicy tobacco, tomato leaf and dark chocolate notes that linger on the finish. Shiraz and Viognier. Drink now through 2028.

ROBERT PARKER'S WINE ADVOCATE
98

Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

Who would've thought that in the context of Barossa Shiraz, the 2015 RunRig would seem like a relative bargain? It's certainly much less expensive than Grange or Hill of Grace will be when they're released. It's also more approachable in its youth, with enormously appealing aromas of grilled fruit, savory complexities and rich, velvety tannins. Of course, it's full-bodied and concentrated, with the stuffing to age for up to a couple of decades, and it has a long, licorice-tinged finish. Winemaker Ian Hongell, who joined Torbreck from Peter Lehmann, may not have made this wine, but he deserves a lot of credit for the blending and finishing of this tour de force.